Get Prepared

What can I do before a fire?

The potential for loss of life and property due to wildfire is a reality in our fire dependent ecosystem. There are proven steps that residents, visitors and our community can take before a fire to improve our survivability and resiliency.

a home with attached deck and garage

Make My Home Fire Safe
This helpful video is about preparing your home. Use arrows on the left to understand where a home is vulnerable to embers.
Home Hardening means taking steps to reduce the vulnerability of homes to embers and heat that accompany most wildfires.

  • For details specific to each arrow, visit the Society for Fire Protection Engineer's virtual handbook
  • Sign up for a Wildfire Risk Assessment.
  • Visit our Resource page for loads of information including a home hardening checklist.
  • Learn what it means to be ember aware.
This iconography was used with permission from University of Nevada, Reno Extension and the Living With Fire Program.
home and garage with rings of home ignition zones surrounding

Create a Defensible Space
Every home has an invisible Home Ignition Zone (HIZ), concentric rings, around the home that provide ember and flame resistance to fire spreading to the house.  

This iconography was used from San Diego County Fire Protection District Sandiegocounty.gov 
Neighborhood evac

Ensure Emergency Access to My Neighborhood and Home
Good access helps emergency responders arrive in a timely manner and facilitates safe evacuation. If you have concerns about your access, contact your local fire district.

Sign up for Code Red, the County emergency management notification system.

This iconography was used with permission from University of Nevada, Reno Extension and the Living With Fire Program.

How Homes Burn

Make My Community Safer
Community safety begins at your front door. The efforts made on your property reduce the risk of high fire severity. Here are some examples demonstrating the strength of mitigation. 

This iconography was used with permission from University of Nevada, Reno Extension and the Living With Fire Program.

animas city mountain RX burn

Plan My Safe Evacuation
The following are checklists you can download now to plan, practice, and share with everyone in your home so that you're organized in the moment.

If your household receives an evacuation notice, it will list the location of an evacuation site where you can check in and receive credentials for re-entry once it's declared safe.

What do I do after the fire

Considerations After Wildfire
A wildfire could impact our water supply and transportation routes, or cause damage to your property and home. 

  • Ash, smoke and other containments are harmful to your health, be prepared with gloves and respirators or face masks. Be on the look out for trees and structural components that could fall and any occurrence of smoke.
  • Once you are allowed to reenter your residence take photos and reach your insurance.
  • Verify utilities are working properly.
  • Soil erosion becomes a major concern after wildfire. Several techniques are available for controlling erosion, including reseeding, the use of a straw mulch, and felling damaged trees across a slope. Planting of conservation grasses like crested wheatgrass can also help control erosion.
This iconography was used with permission from University of Nevada, Reno Extension and the Living With Fire Program.